Deacon Edward Waldo

Contents

Personal and Family Information

Deacon was born on 23 APR 1684 in Dunstable, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, the son of John Waldo and Rebecca Adams.

He died on 3 AUG 1767 in Windham, Windham County, Connecticut.

He had two marriages/partners. His first wife was Thankful Dimmock, who he married on 25 JUN 1705 in Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. Their ten known children were Shubael (1707-?), Edward (1709-?), John (1717-1726), Bethuel (1719-?), Thankful (1721-1726), Joannah (1723-?), Zacheus (1725-?), John (1728-1814), Cornelius (1711-1804) and Ann (1714-1734).

His second wife was Mary Paine, who he married in AFT 1757 in Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. They had no known children.

Pedigree Chart (3 generations)


 

Deacon Edward Waldo
(1684-1767)

 

John Waldo
(1659-1700)

 

Deacon Cornelius Waldo
(1624-1700)

 

Waldo
(-?)

 
   

Unknown
(-?)

 
   

Hannah Cogswell
(-?)

   
 
 
     
 
 
   

Rebecca Adams
(1652-1727)

 

Samuel Adams
(1616-1688)

   
 
 
     
 
 
   

Rebecca Graves
(1628-1664)

   
 
 
     
 
 

Events

EventDateDetailsSourceMultimediaNotes
Birth23 APR 1684
Place: Dunstable, Middlesex County, Massachusetts
Death3 AUG 1767
Place: Windham, Windham County, Connecticut

Notes

Note 1

Edward Waldo , son of John (son of Cornelius) and Rebecca (Adams)Waldo, was born April 23, 1684, at Dunstable, Massachusetts. He was educated in the Boston schools and for a number of years taught school in Windham, Connecticut. He lived in that part of Windham which is now Scotland, and became an extensive farmer.

He built a house in that town near the county line in about 1714, which was still standing and occupied by one of his descendants in 1900, when Lincoln Waldo wrote the book from which I got most of my information for this Waldo family tree.

Edward Waldo married Thankful, daughter of Dea. Shubael (son of Thomas) and Joanna (Bursley) Dimmock of Nansfield, Connecticut, on June 28, 1706, at Windham. She was born March, 1682. at Barnstable, Massachusetts, and died Dec. 13, 1757, at Windham. His second wife, Mary, of whose existence we first learn from his will, was probably a daughter of Ellisha (son of Thomas) and Rebecca (Doane) Paine of Eastham, Massachusetts. She was born Feb. 1, 1695, and was the widow of Robert, son of Constant and Jane (Treat) Freeman, by whom she had either 5 or 9 children. Records differ.

Edward and Thankful were first members of the Windham Church and then transferred to the Scotland Church in 1735. The Separatist movement, which began in 1746, found strong support and sympathy in Edward and his family. He, Thankful, and sons, Cornelius, Zacheus and John were all members of the Separate Church in 1746. Edward Waldo was one of the signers of a petition, dated April 16, 1753, praying for the benefit of the Toleration Act. "In 1768, Deacon Edward Waldo made confession for unlawful separation and was restored to his former standing in the First Church."

Edward Waldo represented Windham in the General Assembly in 1722, 1725, and 1730. He was a lieutenant in the Windham Militia. There are many records of real estate transactions of Edward in Windham. He was the owner of many parcels of land in Windham and Norwich, Connecticut.

Edward Waldo died on August 3, 1767, at Windham, Connecticut, aged about 84 years. The record of his will can be found in "Windham Probate Records, vol. vii., p. 296. Edward and Thankful Waldo are buried in the Palmertown Cemetery at Scotland, Connecticut. Their gravestones, in good preservation, were still standing in 1900 when Waldo Lincoln wrote his genealogy.

The children of Edward and Thankful Waldo were: Shubael, Edward, Cornelius, Anne, John, Bethuel, Thankful, Joannah, Zacheus, and John (2).

Sources:

"Genealogy of the Waldo Family, A Record of the Descendants of Cornelius Waldo of Ipswich, Massachusetts From 1647 TO 1900" by Waldo Lincoln A. B.; from which came a lot of the information on the Waldos in this tree.

"Genealogical and Family History of the County of Jefferson, NY": a record of the achievements of her people and the phenomenal growth of her agricultural and mechanical industries; New York, Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1905; pgs. 943-944.

www.ancestry.com.